Musket V-Twin Advances with Alloy Barrels Plus New Rods and Crankshaft

New alloy barrel casting for the Musket V-Twin

New alloy barrel casting for the Musket V-Twin

It's been some time since I last checked to see how the Musket V-Twin was moving along and I was surprised to see Aniket has designed, made patterns, cast and machined all new alloy barrels for the engine. He also machined new billet, roller bearing connecting rods and a new crankshaft, too. We're getting pretty close to seeing a completely new engine with fewer and fewer original parts.

Alloy barrel with sleeve installed

Alloy barrel with sleeve installed

The barrels were redesigned to enable tappet adjustments through an access window instead of inside the rocker cover. It looks like everything turned out great. Aniket is mastering the design and casting process to the point where an idea like this can be conceived and carried out with a high expectation of success. The cases will still accept stock barrels, but these make the adjustment process easier and the engine loses weight to the tune of 8 pounds per barrel.

Wood pattern for the new alloy barrel

Wood pattern for the new alloy barrel

All of this work is being done for the build of the first customer ordered Musket. Unfortunately, Aniket relays some truly bad news about the customer's ill health along the way. The goal now is to finish the build so the customer can ride his machine while he is still able.

New billet connecting rods with roller bearings

New billet connecting rods with roller bearings

Excellent work, Aniket, as always and a truly heart felt wish your customer has an opportunity to ride his new machine for many miles.

Link: MusketVtwin

Comment Policy: The Kneeslider does not endorse nor imply agreement with any particular comment just because we let it stand, but, you already knew that. Comments are moderated and should be closely related to post content. Personal attacks, personal grievances, profanity and other unhelpful remarks will be removed. Please read the entire post and check for included links before commenting or asking questions. We invite your thoughts and ideas so we may have an interesting and civil conversation. Thank you.

Comments

  1. Paulinator says

    Gorgeous stuff!!! I had an old BSA C11 basket case. The little single was so heavy I could barely lift the basket. Good idea with the alloy barrels. Lighter weight and better heat-transfer. How much interference fit do you use when you press in the sleeves?

  2. Jiro says

    I thought that all the new bikes used plain bearings with one piece crankshafts? I am not trying to detract from the spectacular success of Anket, but aren’t roller bearings the land of two strokes?

    • tim says

      I am about the furtherest thing from being an engineer, but I do regularly read Kevin Cameron. In a fairly recent column he was talking about plain bearing crankshafts. If I recall correctly the context was a discussion about wet or dry sump engines. To make a plain bearing crankshaft work you need to completely re-engineer the oil system for continuous stable high pressure oil feed. Its a fairly major design decision which has flow on effects throughout the engine and the rest of the vehicle. This original design dates from a time when a bit of a splash every now and again was all the lubrication system could deliver. These roller bearings will tolerate that whereas if at any point you starve your plain bearing crank it gets expensive very quickly.

  3. says

    I have a book entitled “The Fine Art of the Motorcycle Engine” and I can assure you that there is not a more beautiful engine in the book than your Musket V-Twin, period. It seems that once you design your own heads that the motorcycle will be completely yours, no RE parts at all. Is this correct?

  4. says

    I earnestly hope that Aniket will get backers or partners so he will have the resources to manufacture these engines in some quantity, say a few hundred to a few thousand units per year.
    Even if it means making them in India….

Let us know what you think