Motus Shows Off the MV4 and MV4R Dyno Chart – Updated with Sound

Motus MV4 and MV4R dyno chart

Motus MV4 and MV4R dyno chart

How much horsepower does the Motus MV4 and MV4R actually make? Wonder no more, this chart tells all. The MV4 comes in at 165 horsepower and 123 foot pounds of torque. The MV4R raises that bar to 180 hp and 126 foot pounds.

It's certainly enough to make for an exciting ride, but that baby block V4 is just perfect for, ... well, ... just about anything. Think little sports cars, ATVs, boats, airplanes, you name it. Can't wait to see this popping up everywhere.

Update: Audio files below are of the MV4, first in a 3000 RPM ride by and then a 6000 RPM pass. Forget the tech specs, forget the dyno charts, forget everything else about comparisons with other motorcycle engines, the MV4 has an absolutely spectacular sound.

 

Link: Motus Motorcycles

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Comments

  1. Paulinator says

    Comparing the Motus to the Rotax 912 you will see that the stroke is 11% longer (2.67″ versus 2.4″). The continuous-duty rpm will probably be correspondingly about 11% lower. The swept volume of the Motus will then be only about 6% larger than the Rotax, while swinging props at the same speed thru PSRUs. There are sure to be pioneers that will give this beautiful little engine wings, but I don’t see it revolutionizing light/recreational aviation in its current configuration.

    • Paul Crowe says

      Sometimes, the tech specs, though very important, miss part of the appeal. I embedded the sound files in the post above to let everyone hear again, what an amazing sound this little “baby block” V4 has. For aviation, think about what it would sound like in a scale WWII fighter replica or something similar. Given equal performance with a Rotax, the MV4 wins on sound alone.

      Listening to the sound, it’s hard to imagine this coming from a motorcycle, it’s more like a drag racer or stock car. I hear it and the image of a motorcycle just doesn’t appear in my mind’s eye. For a real motorhead from the old days, like, … well, … me, it just doesn’t get any better than this.

      Growing up when this sort of sound was the order of the day, probably explains why my attitude toward electric motorcycles is a bit tepid. They don’t stir the emotions with their high pitched whine, no matter how well they may or may not perform, and it’s why many in my generation, the “boomers,” will not be large scale adapters of electrics. I appreciate the technology, but it’s emotionless. The MV4 grabs you as soon as it lights up.

      • Paulinator says

        OK you got me. Now I can’t shake the thought of a little half-scale spit or mustang tearing holes in the sky.

  2. Jason says

    I am taking composite courses to learn how to fabricate with carbon fiber, and I now want to build a little carbon car with this engine like I’ve never wanted anything before

  3. GenWaylaid says

    Might be fun to drop one of these in an old V-4 Saab for a ridiculous sleeper. Of course, one would probably have to rebuild the entire drivetrain to handle that power.

    Torque steer wouldn’t be a problem, though. Looks like Saab was mounting the V-4 longitudinally.

  4. B50 Jim says

    Michigan International Speedway, summer 1970. The last of the big blocks… 426 Hemis, Ford and Chevy 427s, all running under a blanket at 195. This audio brings back that glorious sound. Wow!

    I want two!

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